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7-Day Heart-Healthy Mediterranean Diet Meal Plan – EatingWell

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The Mediterranean diet consistently ranks as one of the healthiest diets for the wide variety of fruits and vegetables, whole grains, proteins and other nutrient-dense foods it encourages. This flexible eating style has numerous health benefits and is more customizable than a restrictive eating plan, which makes it easier to incorporate in your routine. In the past, the focus of the Mediterranean diet has been on the traditional cuisine of larger countries like Italy, France, Spain and Greece. In reality, the Mediterranean region is very large and includes 22 countries spanning three continents: Europe, Asia and Africa. We’re refocusing our understanding of the Mediterranean diet and being more inclusive of all the countries (and flavor!) that this beautiful region has to offer. 

Why This Meal Plan Is Great for You

In this heart-healthy meal plan, we incorporate the principles of the Mediterranean diet by focusing on veggie-forward meals, fruits and a wide variety of proteins, healthy fats and whole grains. To support a healthy ticker, we limited saturated fat and sodium while including at least 33 grams a day of heart-healthy fiber. One principle of the Mediterranean diet is to cook and enjoy more meals at home, which research indicates can bring numerous health benefits. Consuming home-cooked meals at least five times in a week has the strongest correlation to improved health outcomes, including reducing cholesterol and decreasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. In this plan, we set the calories at 1,500 calories per day and included modifications for 1,200 and 2,000 calories per day to accommodate different calorie needs. As with all meal plans, this is meant to serve as a framework for a healthy eating plan. Make adjustments as needed to fit your taste preferences and routine.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Yes, definitely. Meal plans are meant to be enjoyed and to simplify your routine. If there’s a different option you prefer, feel free to make the swap. We have plenty of nutritious Mediterranean diet recipes to browse for inspiration. Depending on your household size, you could also opt for leftovers when you have them. In this plan, we set the calories at 1,500 calories per day and aimed for at least 70 grams of protein and at least 33 grams of heart-healthy fiber. To promote heart health, we capped the sodium at 1,500 milligrams per day and capped the saturated fat at no more than 12 grams per day, with a higher saturated fat allowance on days we include fish rich in omega-3 fatty acids, like salmon.

  • Absolutely. If you prefer to eat the same breakfast or lunch each day, that works. Each breakfast is roughly 350 to 400 calories and each lunch is about 300 to 400 calories. The meals are similar enough in calories that a simple swap can still help you meet your nutrition goals. That said, if you’re closely tracking calories, you’ll want to make sure to make adjustments in the rest of your routine.

  • The Mediterranean diet is a nutrient-rich style of eating that focuses on a wide variety of healthy foods. Because of its focus on plant-based foods, it tends to be high in fiber, which is an important nutrient for heart health. It also emphasizes cooking more meals at home, which brings many health benefits, including a reduced sodium intake compared to eating more meals out.

Can the Mediterranean Diet Improve Heart Health?

Research links adherence to the Mediterranean diet with improved cardiovascular outcomes and a reduced risk of death from heart-related causes. Specifically, a high intake of vegetables, legumes and nuts combined with a high intake of monounsaturated fats and a lower intake of saturated fats was associated with lower all-cause mortality. And, a high vegetable intake was significantly associated with lower cardiovascular-related mortality. The American Heart Association endorses the Mediterranean-style diet as a heart-healthy eating plan that aligns with their recommendations. Check out 7 Ways to Follow the Mediterranean Diet for Better Health for more tips on how to incorporate Mediterranean diet habits into your routine. 

Heart-Healthy Foods to Focus On:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Whole grains (bulgur, quinoa, oats, freekeh, brown rice, whole wheat and more)
  • Beans
  • Lentils
  • Nuts and natural nut butters
  • Seeds
  • Olive oil, avocado oil, sesame oil and other monounsaturated fats
  • Fish
  • Shellfish
  • Eggs
  • Poultry
  • Dairy, especially fermented dairy like yogurt and kefir
  • Herbs and spices

How to Meal-Prep Your Week of Meals:

  1. Make Triple-Berry Blended Oats to have for breakfast on Days 2 through 5.
  2. Prepare Chopped Salad with Chickpeas, Olives & Feta to have for lunch on Days 2 through 4.

Day 1

Ali Redmond


Breakfast (396 calories)

A.M. Snack (131 calories)

  • 1 large pear

Lunch (409 calories)

  • 1 serving Green Goddess Wrap
  • 1 (5.3-oz.) container low-fat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt

P.M. Snack (59 calories)

  • 1 medium peach

Dinner (526 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,521 calories, 65g fat, 13g saturated fat, 74g protein, 175g carbohydrate, 39g fiber, 1,467mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum, omit yogurt at lunch and change dinner to 1 serving Sheet-Pan Chili-Lime Salmon with Potatoes & Peppers.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds to A.M. snack, add 2 Tbsp. sliced almonds and ¼ cup blueberries to lunch, and add 1 cup edamame in pods to P.M. snack.

Day 2

Photographer: Rachel Marek, Food stylist: Holly Dreesman, Prop stylist: Gabriel Greco


Breakfast (390 calories)

A.M. Snack (192 calories)

  • 1 (5.3-oz.) container low-fat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • ½ cup blackberries
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds

Lunch (351 calories)

P.M. Snack (206 calories)

  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds

Dinner (384 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,522 calories, 67g fat, 11g saturated fat, 80g protein, 160g carbohydrate, 38g fiber, 1,147mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Omit yogurt and chia seeds at A.M. snack and change P.M. snack to ¼ cup blueberries.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 3/4 cup nonfat plain kefir to breakfast, add 2 servings Blueberry-Pecan Energy Balls to A.M. snack, and add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to the apple at lunch.

Day 3

Breakfast (390 calories)

A.M. Snack (180 calories)

  • 1 cup edamame, in pods

Lunch (351 calories)

P.M. Snack (183 calories)

  • ¾ cup low-fat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 1 medium peach

Dinner (415 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,518 calories, 66g fat, 12g saturated fat, 76g protein, 170g carbohydrate, 40g fiber, 1,354mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum and change P.M. snack to 1 clementine.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to the apple at lunch and add ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds and 1 medium orange as an evening snack.

Day 4

Photographer: Morgan Hunt Glaze, Food Stylist: Jennifer Wendorf, Prop Stylist: Shell Royster


Breakfast (390 calories)

A.M. Snack (180 calories)

  • 1 cup edamame, in pods

Lunch (351 calories)

P.M. Snack (125 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain kefir
  • 1 clementine

Dinner (463 calories)

Meal-Prep Tip: Reserve one serving Stuffed Cabbage Soup to have for lunch tomorrow.

Daily Totals: 1,505 calories, 69g protein, 12g saturated fat, 70g protein, 164g carbohydrate, 37g fiber, 1,318mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to ½ cup sliced strawberries and omit side salad at dinner.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add ¾ cup low-fat plain Greek yogurt to breakfast, add ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds to P.M. snack, and add ½ an avocado, sliced, to dinner.

Day 5

Photographer: Fred Hardy, Food Stylist: Jennifer Wendorf, Prop Stylist: Lydia Purcell


Breakfast (390 calories)

A.M. Snack (152 calories)

  • 1 cup nonfat plain kefir
  • 1 medium orange

Lunch (300 calories)

P.M. Snack (105 calories)

  • 1 medium banana

Dinner (537 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,483 calories, 51g fat, 12g saturated fat, 80g protein, 184g carbohydrate 33g fiber, 1,320mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to 1 plum and change dinner to 1 serving Anti-Inflammatory Chicken & Beet Salad.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 (5.3-oz.) container low-fat plain Greek yogurt to breakfast, add 2 Tbsp. natural peanut butter to P.M. snack, and add 1 serving Massaged Kale Salad to dinner.

Day 6

Photographer: Greg DuPree, Prop stylist: Shell Royster, Food stylist: Emily Hall


Breakfast (343 calories)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • ½ cup sliced strawberries

A.M. Snack (162 calories)

  • 1 medium apple
  • ¾ cup nonfat plain kefir

Lunch (402 calories)

P.M. Snack (180 calories)

  • 1 cup edamame, in pods

Dinner (398 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,488 calories, 58g fat, 11g saturated fat, 86g protein, 172g carbohydrate, 34g fiber, 1,215mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Omit banana at lunch and change A.M. snack to ¼ cup blueberries.

Make it 2,000 calories: Add 1 serving Peanut Butter & Chia Berry Jam English Muffin to breakfast, add 1 medium orange to P.M. snack, and add 1 serving Traditional Greek Salad to dinner.

Day 7

Photography: Rachel Marek, Food stylist: Kelsey Moylan, Prop stylist: Gabriel Greco


Breakfast (343 calories)

  • 1 cup low-fat plain strained (Greek-style) yogurt
  • 3 Tbsp. chopped almonds
  • 1 Tbsp. chia seeds
  • ½ cup sliced strawberries

A.M. Snack (131 calories)

  • 1 large pear

Lunch (358 calories)

P.M. Snack (237 calories)

  • ¼ cup unsalted dry-roasted almonds
  • 1 plum

Dinner (416 calories)

Daily Totals: 1,485 calories, 74g fat, 12g saturated fat, 90g protein, 131g carbohydrate, 31g fiber, 1,468mg sodium

Make it 1,200 calories: Change A.M. snack to ½ cup blueberries and omit almonds at P.M snack.

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